1. Author

    Just to give you some stats, Florida’s Solar Electric installations dropped from 35 megawatts in 2010 to 17 megawatts in 2011. That dropped our rank among states from #8 to #17 – embarrassing!

    The price of PV panels dropped dramatically and the rebate came into effect. The only explanation for the drop is that the FPL rebate program limits the amount of PV installed. This is contrary to the stated goal of encouraging private solar electric system installations.

    All that being said, it is STILL cheaper to install solar today WITHOUT the FPL rebate than it was a few years ago WITH state rebates!

  2. Jason,

    The best way to take advantage of the 30% federal tax credit and the FP&L rebate is to invest in a total solar roof integrated system. This way you can use your 30% federal tax credit to pay for a new roof as well as the solar energy system.

    It does not make sense to install solar energy systems that damage the existing roofing. Many of these roofs would benefit from a new roof retro-fit to increase wind uplift performance, energy efficiency and aesthetics. Sustainability is key.

  3. Author


    You may be interested in some comments I made recently on Building Integrated PV (BIPV) at:

    The tax credit is a nice feature of BIPV that I failed to address. However, unless you actually need a new roof or have a new construction situation, there is no reason to replace a perfectly good roof with BIPV. It’s still not cost competitive when looking at the comparative energy produced, even with the tax benefits.

    Implying that traditional solar rack systems damage existing roofs is patently wrong and misleading.

    BIPV does have its place, but the retrofit solar panel market is far larger and more developed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *